Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd World Congress on Biopolymers Manchester, UK.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Biopolymer Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Suresh S. Narine photo
Biography:

Suresh Narine, named in 2011 as one of Canada’s Top 40 Under 40 Leaders, is Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Chemistry at Trent University; he also is the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Industrial Research Chair in Lipid Derived Biomaterials, the Ontario Research Chair in Green Chemistry and Engineering and the Director of the Trent Centre for Biomaterials Research. His work focuses on the creation of petrochemical replacements for pharmaceuticals, lubricants, polymers, adhesives, and high-value materials from vegetable oils. He is the author of nearly 200 peer reviewed publications and more than 60 patents.

Abstract:

Functional thermoplastics are much sought after because of their reprocessibility and wide applicability. They are used in a wide variety of applications ranging from automotive parts and building construction to footwear, wire and cable insulation jackets, biomedical devices, etc. Polyesters, polyesteramides and polyesterurethanes present a versatile combination of chemical and physical properties such as biodegradability, flexibility, resistance to dilute acids and alkalis, thermal stability and mechanical strength. There is a desire to utilize renewable feedstock such as vegetable oils to synthesize these materials and therefore reduce their carbon footprint. This talk will detail a careful structure-function approach to the optimization of monomeric structure, polymerization protocol and polymer structure so as to produce lipid-based thermoplastics which are equivalent to or even more functional than current thermoplastics used in the industry. The talk will focus on the synthesis of the monomers, the variation of polymerization protocol, and the relationship of structure to mechanical, thermal and degradation properties.

Keynote Forum

Yi Pang

The University of Akron, USA

Keynote: Developing environment-sensitive molecular probes for target binding-activated fluorescence imaging

Time : 09:30-09:55

OMICS International Biopolymer Congress 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yi Pang photo
Biography:

Yi Pang received his PhD in 1990 from Iowa State University, USA. He was a Post-doctoral fellow at US DOE Ames Laboratory during 1991-1993. He is currently a Professor at The University of Akron. He has published more than 135 research papers in reputed journals. His current research interests include synthesis of luminescent polymers, and development of fluorescent molecular probes for recognition of biologically important species.

Abstract:

Recognition of specific biomolecules such as a unique proteins in biological cells is critical for basic biomedical research and the development of novel clinical diagnostics. Considerable interests exist in searching for the novel fluorescent probes that can target specific biological tissues/molecules to meet the need for advanced bioimaging. For in vivo tracking of a specific type of biomolecule or tissue, the probes are also required to be non-toxic, and their presence should not disturb the normal biological development process. In the presentation, we discuss a new class of fluorescent imaging dyes, which are typically non-fluorescent in an aqueous environment. The probes, however become highly fluorescent upon binding to biomolecules such as proteins. The binding-activated fluorescence on biomolecules can be further developed to give wash-free imaging reagents, as those free probes are nearly non-fluorescent in the surrounding aqueous environments. Further extending this concept has led to advanced imaging reagents, which selectively targets the biomolecules in the subunits of biological cells, e.g. organelles, to give fluorescence turn on.

  • Track 4: Biopolymers as Materials
    Track 5: Green Composites in Biopolymers
Speaker

Chair

Lovely Mathew

Mahatma Gandhi University, India

Session Introduction

Masatoshi Kubouchi

Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

Title: Study on curing condition of furan resin for matrix of green composites

Time : 09:55-10:15

Speaker
Biography:

Masatoshi Kubouchi has completed his Dr. of Eng. at the age of 35 years from Tokyo Institute of Technology. He is the vice dean of School of Materials and Chemical Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology. He has published 30 academic books and more than 140 papers in reputed journals and has been succeedd in academic societies, ex. the president of the material sicence society of Japan, and the chair of the division of chemical plant material engineering, the Soc. Of Chem. Eng., Japan.

Abstract:

Green composites have recently attracted attention due to its derivation from renewable plant resources. The dwindling of the fossil resources has increased an interest in developing renewable materials such as PLA or other biodegradabule ones, however in general these materials shows low mechanical properties. From this point of view, natural fiber reinforced plastics (NFRPs) with green polymer matrix are recognized as an alternative for synthetic materials. Furan resin made from corn cob or other vegetable resources is one of the renewable biobased thermosets which shows no biodegradability but has a higher resistance to chemical and heat than the other plant-derived thermoplastics. Intoroduceing fran resin as a matrix, long-life durability and high mechanical performance can be expected. However because of this resin is very brittle and curing mechanism has not been cleared, it is difficult to cure as a composite matrix resin. Since in previous research it was suggested that this resin needed oxygen in cureing process, hydrogen peroxide was added to improve curing behavior, but the desirable mechanical performance was not accomplished. In additon, through curing reaction and interfacial chemical bonding analysis, an approach to increase the strength and toughness of furan resin was tried. From revision of temperature and time on curing process, average flexural strength was improved to 280 MPa and average elastic modulus was improved to 25 GPa. Furthermore, adding salicylaldehyde as a cupling agents allowed 310 MPa of flexural strength and 27.5 GPa of elastic modulus.

Elisa Mele

University Loughborough, United kingdom

Title: Bioactive nanofibrous systems based on natural materials

Time : 10:15-10:35

Speaker
Biography:

Mele is currently Senior Lecturer in Biomaterials at the Department of Materials of Loughborough University (UK). Her research interests include: Biocompatible and natural polymers for regenerative medicine; Nanofibrous wound dressings with antimicrobial activity and enhanced cell proliferation; Functional nanocomposites with controlled superficial and mechanical properties; Microfluidic devices for biological assays and food safety; Nanofabrication approaches for polymers.

Abstract:

Acute or chronic wounds affect millions of people annually and their incidence is expected to increase in the next years mainly due to the growth and aging of global population. The next generation of wound dressings should be able to promote the regeneration of the injured skin instead of just protecting it. In fact, one of the main limitations of the current devices is the lack of multi-functionality. This suggests that the dressings of the future might be constituted by advanced materials that actively interact with the wound site releasing the specific active agent according to the conditions of the wound. Here we present the development of bioactive dressings by combining biomaterials derived from natural resources and nanofabrication strategies. Composite scaffolds are produced by electrostatic spinning (namely the hydrodynamic extrusion of nanofibres by means of an electrical field) using biocompatible and biodegradable natural polymers, such as polysaccharides (alginate, cellulose). We demonstrated the effective encapsulation of active agents with antibacterial and healing activity (drugs and plant extracts) inside the electrospun nanofibers. We were able to regulate the degradation rate of the composite mats under physiological conditions, and the delivery over time of functional compounds. These templates mimic the organisation of the extracellular matrix and the structure of the human skin, fostering the proliferation and differentiation of cells. Furthermore, the ultrafine size of the fibres guarantees excellent conformability of the non-woven mat to the wound site, proving complete coverage of the injured tissue, and protection against infections and dehydration. The high porosity of the electrospun mesh facilitates the transport of nutrients and the absorption of exudates, together with the effective delivery of therapeutic substances.

Martin A. Masuelli

Stanford University, USA

Title: Alcayota films. effect of crosslinking

Time : 10:35-10:55

Speaker
Biography:

Martin Alberto Masuelli is Doctorate in Chemistry in 2007 and “Master in Surface Sciences and Porous Media” from National San Luis University (UNSL). He is the director of Director of the Laboratory of Physical Chemistry Services, UNSL. He has published more than 19 papers in journals and has been serving as an reviewer and editorial board member of repute, 5 book chapters and 52 congress presentation. Guest Editor of the Books: "Fiber Reinforced Polymers-The Applied Technology for Concrete Repair," INTECH, Croatia, 2013; "Advances in Physicochemical Properties of Biopolymers”, Bentham Publishing, USA, April 2016; "Biopackaging", CRC Press, April 2017. Editor in Chief and founder of the Journal of Polymer Physics and Chemistry Biopolymers, July 2013.

Abstract:

Varieties of renewable biopolymers such as polysaccharides were obtained from plant have been investigated for the development of edible/biodegradable non petrochemical-based packaging materials and edible coatings. Alcayota (Curcubita ficifolia) is an interesting alternative to synthetic gas-barrier polymers in packaging applications. The films have low gas permeability under dry conditions due to their high contents of hydrogen bonds. The films were prepared from water solution of hydrolyzed alcayota gum (Alc-OH). The film of Galc-OH properties are mainly due to the strong hydrophilicity. In order to improve water resistance, the films were modified using glutaraldehyde (Glu). The films of Galc-OH were immersed in solutions Glu for a period of 12 and 24 hours (Alc-OH-12G and Alc-OH-24G). The crosslinked films providing a water vapor permeability (WVP) values in the range from 2.32 to 1.59x10-10 g m/m2 s Pa and mechanical properties expressed in elastic modulus from 336.86 to 465.41MPa. The X-ray diffraction showed amorphous and shift to lower d-spacing, i.e. at lower distances between the polysaccharide chains. These crosslinked membranes exhibit excellent water resistance, low O2 permeation, which make them very useful in selecting biodegradable films.

Break:
Networking and Refreshment Break 10:55-11:10 @ Outside Room
Speaker
Biography:

Lovely Mathew has completed her PhD from Cochin University of Science and Technology in 2006. She was the professor of Chemistry Faculty in Newman College, Kerala since 1981. After her retirement in 2015, now she is working as a Professor and Dean of research in an Engineering College, Kerala. She has published more than 20 papers in reputed international/national journals and has presented several research papers in various international conferences abroad. Her research area is natural fibre/nanocelluose reinforced polymer composites/Nanocomposites. She has completed several major research projects funded by DST, UGC KSCSTE, etc.. She is a registered guide of International and Inter University Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala ,India

Abstract:

Nature inspires us to develop new high performance materials from its renewable resources and among these cellulose nano whiskers are most popular due to their unusual properties and resulting applications. For environmental awareness and due to the international demand for green technology, bio nano composites have the potential to replace present petrochemical based materials. Their flexibility during processing highly specified stiffness and low cost make them attractive to manufactures. This century has witnessed ever increasing demands for the utilization of biomaterials as fillers in polymer composites. Bio fiber reinforced plastic composites are gaining more and more acceptance in structural applications and has recently intensified in various industrial field especially the polyamide composites gained much attention because of their versatile properties. In this work, cellulose nano crystals (CNC’s) have been extracted from the bark of helicteres isora plant by acid hydrolysis method and they have been used to reinforce polyamide (PA) by electro spinning method for the preparation of nano composites. The morphological, mechanical, and wetting studies of resulting nano composites have been investigated. From the morphological studies using SEM and AFM, it is observed that with an increase in CNC content, diameter of the produced polyamide nano composite fibers are decreased to some extent and the surface is smooth and has no cracks which indicated that the CNCs are well dispersed in the PA matrix without significant aggregation. The static water-contact angle measurement studies showed that with the addition of CNC’s, contact angle values of the composites are found to be decreased, which pointed out the enhanced hydrophilic nature of the composite. With an increase in the filler loadings, the material resistance to nano indentation is also found to be increased. Some of the proposed applications for these products are as filters for the separation of sub-micron particles, as reinforcing fillers in composite materials, as wound-dressing and tissue scaffolding materials for medical uses and as controlled release materials for agricultural and pharmaceutical uses.

Speaker
Biography:

Professor of Biophysics with a Natural Sciences research background and extensive experience in industrial research. Whilst I continue with some industrial projects, my research interests are now primarily focused on fundamental questions in quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, relativity, thermodynamics and condensed matter physics that can improve our understanding of self assembly in biological systems and new materials development.

Abstract:

Based on laboratory based growth of plant-like structures from inorganic materials, we present new theory for the emergence of plant structures at a range of scales dictated by levels of ionization (charge density), which can be traced directly back to proteins transcribed from genetic code and their interaction with external sources of charge (such as CO2) in real plants. Beyond a critical percolation threshold, individual charge induced quantum potentials (driven by dissipative systems) merge to form a complex, interconnected geometric web, creating macroscopic quantum potentials, which lead to the emergence of macroscopic quantum processes. The assembly of molecules into larger, ordered structures operates within these charge-induced coherent bosonic fields, acting as a structuring force in competition with exterior potentials. Within these processes many of the phenomena associated with standard quantum theory are recovered, including quantization, non-dissipation, self-organization, confinement, structuration conditioned by the environment, environmental fluctuations leading to macroscopic quantum decoherence and evolutionary time described by a time dependent Schrödinger-like equation, which describes models of bifurcation and duplication. Evidence for macroscopic quantum phenomena has previously been reported in photosynthetic systems [2,3] The theory and evidence presented in the current work suggests that macroscopic quantum systems are not an exception in plant systems, but actually play a key role in the emergence of structure. Based on these insights we consider how the fundamental principles

Speaker
Biography:

Shivani Bhardwaj Mishra is working as Professor at Nanotechnology and water sustainability unit, University of South Africa. She obtained her PhD from Jamia Millia Islamia, India. Prof. Bhardwaj (Mishra) is currently group leader of the research area for the sol gel science and technology, polymer ceramic composites/nanocomposites, organic-inorganic hybrid systems and its application for water research. She has an experience of more than 14 years of teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level and supervised Doctoral and Master’s students. She has many local and international collaborations and has published over 75 research articles in peer reviewed scientifically accredited international journal. She has been recognized as Fellow of Royal Society of Chemistry [FRSC] and has been acknowledged as rated researcher with C-3 rating by National Research Foundation, South Africa. Recentle she has been awarded Unisa’s Chancellor’s award for her research excellence.

Abstract:

Bionanocomposites derived from natural hydrogels have shown an effective material for water purification. These natural hydrogels matrices falls under the category of superabsorbents that can absorb large volume of water. Bionanocomposites synthesized from these matrices reinforced with nanomaterials are designed to obtain a supramolecular interpenetrating network capacity that is expected to absorb water many-folds when compared to its pristine form. Hydrogels has an ability to change its chemical structure that induces the volume change as per the physical conditions such as pH, temperature, salt concentration, electric field, solvent quantity thus making these material as stimuli responsive smart polymers and can be modified to smart materials with tailor made properties. To suit to a type of an application, the bionanocomposites can be devised with unique properties that can be exploited for natural, applied and medical sciences. This talk deals with the recent research progress in the area of bionanocomposites and its application to waste water treatment. [1-3].

Luiz Henrique Capparelli Mattoso

National Nanotechnology Laboratory for Agribusiness , Brazil

Title: Maximum utilization of plant resources to produce edible nanocomposite bioplastics

Time : 12:10-12:30

Speaker
Biography:

Luiz H. C. Mattoso has completed his Ph.D. in Materials Engineering in 1993 from Federal University of São Carlos (Brazil). He was a visiting scientist at Université Montpellier (France), Domaine Universitaire de Grenoble (France), and USDA (CA, USA). He was the Center Director of Embrapa Instrumentation, a Brazilian federal research organization, where he acts as a Senior Researcher. He has published more than 275 papers in reputed journals and 30 book chapters, edited 10 books, won over 25 awards and distinctions, filed 14 patents, served as reviewer and as editorial board member of several scientific journals.

Abstract:

Environmentally friendly alternatives have been widely explored to replace petroleum-based, non-biodegradable materials for many applications, including food contact materials such as free-standing thin films for food packaging purposes. Edible films denote a major sustainable concept to produce food packaging with unique characteristics and functions. The research carried out at the LNNA of Embrapa in Brazil, together with national and international partners, has demonstrated the potential of plant materials as source of biopolymers, active ingredients, and reinforcement fillers for the production of multifunctional edible bioplastics. Numerous plant-derived polysaccharides (e.g., pectins, starches, and cellulose derivatives) and polypeptides (e.g., zein and soy protein) have been used as binding agents to improve the key properties of fruit and vegetable puree-based edible films featuring unique color and flavor, including but not being limited to those based on guava, papaya, banana, acerola, watermelon, and passion fruit. The mechanical, thermal and barrier performances – to mention a few – of the final materials can be further boosted by adding nanostructures extracted from plants too, such as cellulose nanofibers and nanowhiskers. We have also been incorporating essential oils isolated from plants to provide packaging with antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. The aim of this lecture is to provide the audience with an overview of the advances of our research towards the use of fruits and vegetables in an “as natural as possible” manner to produce nanocomposite bioplastics with a novel possibility of being eaten without any health concerns besides being biodegradable and featuring mechanical properties comparable to synthetic plastics.

Speaker
Biography:

Lulu Wang completed her graduate education of pharmaceutical Science and pharmacology from Peking union medical college. She is assigned as accociate professor by the Institute of Materia Medica, CAMS & PUMC, pharmacy department and dedicates to explore novel carriers for drug delivery. She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

In our previous study, thermo sensitive gelling film contained functional biopolymers was proved to be an effective in situ delivery system in the treatment of colorectal cancer. The preparation was observed as free-flowing liquid before use, while a layer of gel film was quickly formed in the rectum when applied. It was well-distributed and had increased contact area with rectum. The gel film, which possessed good bio-compatibility, appropriate gel strength and bioadhesive force, was able to closely combine with rectal mucosa and prolonged action time. Based on that knowledge, a few pharmaceutical technologies were applied to modulate the characters of the encapsulated drugs, such as Cyclodextrin inclusion technology to improve the solubility of water insoluble drugs, micro emulsion technology to increase the infiltration of drugs with poor lipid-solubility, and liposome technology to facilitate the cellular uptake of biological therapeutic drugs. The physicochemical properties were evaluated. Transportation test, cellular uptake and in vivo experiments were conducted as well. In conclusion, the therapeutic requirement could be met by combining active materials with appropriate biopolymer ingredients and the in situ delivery could be an effective alternative for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

Aman Ullah

University of Alberta,Canada

Title: Conversion of lipids into biopolymers and conjugates

Time : 12:50-13:10

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Aman Ullah received his PhD (with distinction) in Chemical Sciences and Technologies in 2010 at the University of Genova, Italy by working together at Southern Methodist University, USA. He is currently working as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and 3 patents/patent applications. Aman was named a Canadian Rising Star in Global Health by Grand Challenges Canada.

Abstract:

Solvent free conversion of canola oil and fatty acid methyl esters (FAME's) derived from canola oil and waste cooking oil under microwave irradiation demonstrated dramatically enhanced rates. The microwave-assisted reactions lead to the most valuable terminal olefins with enhanced yields, purities and dramatic shortening of reaction times. Various monomers/chemicals were prepared in high yield in very short time. The complete conversions were observed at temperatures as low as 50 ºC within less than five minutes. The products were characterized by GC-MS, GC-FID and NMR. The prepared monomers were converted into biopolymers and characterized in detail using NMR, FTIR, DSC, TGA, DMA and mechanical testing techniques. In another approach, amphiphilic ABA type PEG-Lipid conjugated macromolecules have been synthesized using the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition commonly termed as “click chemistry. Characterization of the conjugates has been carried out with the help of 1H-NMR, FTIR and GPC. The conjugates were evaluated for the encapsulation and release of an anticonvulsant drug (carbamazepine) as a hydrophobic drug model in the study. The micellization, drug encapsulation and release behavior of macromolecules was investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and fluorescence spectroscopy. From the results, it has been concluded that the nanoparticles had different average sizes due to different ratio of hydrophilic contents in the conjugate backbone. The Amphiphilic particle size and structure could be altered by changing the ratio of hydrophilic and hydrophobic contents. The in vitro drug encapsulations highlighted that all the drug-loaded micelles had spherical or near-spherical morphology. In vitro drug release study showed the controlled release of hydrophobic drug over a period of 50 hours. The results indicate that there is great potential of renewable lipid-based micelle nanoparticles to be used as hydrophobic drug carriers.

Break:
Lunch Break 13:10-14:10 @ Source Grill
Poster Presentations 14:10-15:00 @ Outside Room
  • Track 7: Biopolymer Feed Stock Challenges & Opportunities
    Track 9: Biopolymers for Tissue Engineering
    Track 12: Future scope of Biopolymers
Speaker

Chair

Florent Allais

Chaire ABI AgroParisTech, France

Speaker
Biography:

Florent Allais is currently a Full Professor in Chemistry at AgroParisTech and the Director of the Chair ABI (Industrial Agro-Biotechnologies) in Reims (France). He has completed his PhD from the University of Florida in 2004 and postdoctoral studies in the group of Prof. Janine Cossy (ESPCI, Paris, France) and Dr. Jean Boivin (ICSN-CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette, France). Prof. Florent Allais has presented his research in numerous international conferences, published more than 30 papers in peer-reviewed journals, granted/filed 8 patents, served as reviewer of various journals and as Associate Editor of Frontiers in Chemistry (Chemical Engineering).

Abstract:

Novel renewable bisphenols were prepared through chemo-enzymatic processes under mild conditions. The enzyme-catalyzed condensation steps have been optimized and lead to high purity grade bisphenols in high to excellent yields.
The antiradical/antioxidant properties of these bio-based bisphenols were investigated and revealed activities similar or higher than that of current commercially available antiradical/antioxidant additives such as Irganox 1010. The bisphenols were then used as monomers for the preparation of various types of alternating aliphatic/aromatic polymers such as copolyesters, polyurethanes, poly(ester-alkenamers). The newly obtained homo- and copolymers were then characterized by NMR, GPC, DSC and TGA. These analyses revealed not only good thermal stabilities but also a broad range of accessible Tg. Linear phenolic homo-oligomers were also prepared through oxidase-mediated oligomerization; their thermal properties and antiradical activities were evaluated.

Speaker
Biography:

Andreas Künkel is head of biopolymer research of BASF. After his Ph.D. in microbiology at the Max Planck Institute for terrestrial microbiology in Marburg, he started his BASF career within the Central R&D department, followed by marketing positions within the divisions Fine Chemicals and Performance Polymers. Since starting in BASF in 1999, his focus has been the strategic development and marketing of chemicals and polymers based on renewable resources using the synergies between classical chemistry and biotechnology.

Abstract:

INTRODUCTION
In 2050 very probably 9 billon people will live on earth, resulting in significant challenges. Major tasks will be supply of food, the more efficient use of resources (raw materials, energy), protecting the environment and prevention of further climate changes.

RENEWABLE RAW MATERIALS AND MONOMERS
Use of renewable raw materials for monomer production offers the opportunity to improve sustainability, esp. the carbon footprint. Important renewable monomers are lactic acid (for PLA), 1,4-butanediol, succinic acid, mid chain dicarboxylic acids (for biodegradable polyesters), 1,3-propanediol (for PTT) and furandicarboxylic acid (for PEF). Actually only 1st generation biorefineries (e.g. corn to glucose) are in place while 2nd generation biorefineries (cellulose to glucose, xylose) are still in infant status. Technological progress has been significant in the last years, but cost competitiveness to the fossil counterparts is difficult to achieve. 1,3-propanediol and succinic acid are examples where the biobased variants seem to be superior in costs and sustainability.

POLYMERS & COMPOUNDS
ecoflex® F, the aliphatic-aromatic BASF polyester, is made from terephthalic acid, butanediol and adipic acid. ecoflex® is the preferred blend partner for biobased and biodegradable polymers which typically do not exhibit good mechanics and processability for film applications by themselves (e.g. starch, PLA). The BASF brand name for compounds of ecoflex® with PLA is ecovio®.[1] The exchange of monomers (e.g. by succinic acid) gives access to polyesters and compounds with new properties.

ORGANIC WASTE MANAGEMENT AND AGRICULTURE AS APPLICATION EXAMPLES
Organic waste management and mulch film in agriculture are two application examples where biodegradable and renewable polymers add value. Approximately 40% of the household waste is organic waste, which can be converted to energy and to valuable compost. To enable this organic recycling, biodegradable organic waste bags and coffee capsules have been developed. Mulch film offers the opportunity to increase crop yield by reducing water consumption, improving microclimate and preventing growth of weeds. Biodegradable mulch film is plowed in the soil after harvest thus reducing the number of working steps.

END OF LIFE AND SUSTAINABILITY
The prerequisite for these applications is the biodegradability of the used polymer compounds. Polymer biodegradation commonly begins with the (hydrolytic) breakdown of the main chain – often enzymatically catalyzed – followed by mineralization of the resulting small molecules by microorganisms present in the respective habitat. Therefore elucidation of the interaction of microorganisms and their respective enzymes with polymer substrates in different environments and deducing relevant structure-property relationships is an important task of BASF biopolymer research.

CONCLUSION
Biodegradable and renewable polymers will not resolve the worlds sustainability challenges. But, smartly used, they will contribute to its solution.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Abbas Teimouri has completed his PhD at the age of 34 years from Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, Iran. He is the associate professor of organic chemistry in Payame Noor University (PNU), Isfahan, Iran. He has published more than 75 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Silk fibroin (SF) is a kind of natural polymers with a great potential in biomedical application. [1] Due to its good biocompatibility, biodegradability, high tensile strength, hemostatic properties, non-cytotoxicity, low antigenicity and minimal inflammatory reaction, SF is an excellent candidate for generating tissue engineering scaffolds [2-4]. Based on previous findings, diopside (CaMgSi2O6) is advised as an excellent bioactive material for artificial bone and dental root, since it shows more potential of apatite formation ability and higher mechanical strength than hydroxyapatite. Moreover, it has been confirmed that the diopside has a fairly high mechanical strength, good bioactivity, excellent bending strength and a good biocompatibility [5-7]. Electrospinning is a new technique to fabricate nanofibrous scaffolds for tissue engineering due to the large surface area to volume ratio, that influences the adhesion, migration, and growth of cells [8]. In the past few years, there has been significant growth in research on exploring electrospun nanofibrous scaffold for tissue engineering applications [9–11]. In this report we extend our recent study on silk composites [12-14]. Silk fibroin/nanodiopside were fabricated via electrospinning. Herein, the effect of nanodiopside on the surface morphology of electrospun Silk fibroin/nanodiopside nanofibers were investigated. Finally, the cytocompatibility of the Silk fibroin/nanodiopside composite nanofibrous scaffold was studied by using MTT test.

Break:
Networking and Refreshment Break 16:00-16:15 @ Outside Room
Speaker
Biography:

Huaping Wang serves as executive director of China Chemical Fiber Industry Association, deputy Director of the Standards Committee, deputy director of Fiber Committee of China & Shanghai Chemical Fiber Textile Engineering Society. He was in charge of more than 20 major projects, such as National Science and Technology Support Program. He was rewarded National Sci-Tech Advance Award 3 times and Provincial and ministerial Prize 8 times. He owns more than 60 authorized National Invention Patents, and has published more than 260 papers in domestic and oversea key academic journal.

Abstract:

Bacterial cellulose (BC) secreted by Acetobacter xylinum (A. xylinum) is a natural and promising biomaterial for application in tissue engineering. However, the low bioactivity and cell penetration capability due to the single cellulose component and the dense 3D microstructure have limited the application of BC for articular cartilage repairing. On the basis of the property requirements of ideal articular cartilage scaffolds, we have addressed the challenges and limitations on current technologies to improve surface bioactivity and enlarging porous structure of BC scaffolds. A biosynthetic approach was chosen to fabricate a series of BC/lotus root starch (BC/LRS) composites for simplifying preparation procedure, controlling microstructure, and improving biocompatibility as articular cartilage scaffolds. Following pretreatment with PVP and SA, BC mineralized in 1.5×SBF solution, had reduced HA precipitation time, and created an optimized crystal morphology along the fiber by increasing Ca2+ adhesion. Particularly, BC scaffolds coated with HA crystal showed increased bioactivity for simulating the calcified layer of articular cartilage. To reconstruct dense microstructure, we created porous structure within BC membrane by using surfactant assisted foaming method in azodicarbonamide aqueous solution (AC). The foaming method was more effective and gave higher-yield compared with previous reported methods. By introducing agarose microparticles into BC substrates as a poragen, we harvested porous BC scaffold with interconnected pores displaying dimensions of 300-500 m, which were identified to facilitate cartilage cells penetration into the internal BC structure and form a 3D distribution.

Francisco M. Goycoolea

University of Leeds, United Kingdom

Title: Biopolymers – Key actors in the medicine of the future

Time : 16:35-16:55

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Goycoolea has twenty years of experience researching on biomass-sourced polymers as building blocks of novel bioinspired materials such as soft hydrogels and nanoparticles for biomedical and biotechnological applications. In 2016, he has been appointed as Chair in Biopolymers at University of Leeds. He has published more than 110 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

The main achievements of science and technology in the last century have brought substantial improvements in the quality of life of the human species (i.e., in food production, health, energy, transport and communications). However, new approaches and a change in paradigms are urgently needed to address remaining gaps in health worldwide. Some of these include: 1) Strategies to fight microbial drug resitance; 2) novel and more effective therapies against cancer; 3) effective therapies against neurological disorders related to aging. The modern understanding of health is based on the concept of regulation of metabolism by a complex network of communication mechanisms based on signaling molecules that regulate basic cellular activities and coordinates cell responses so they can act in concert. These respond to, are controlled by, and can be interrupted by processes occurring in at the molecular and supramolecular/macromolecular scales. The latter are the domain of bioinspired nanomaterials. These biomaterials are believed to be key in the development of new approaches to tackle the disease. A fundamental reason in this respect, is that these materials not only share similar building blocks, but also the hierarchical organization in the length scale of living systems, for example, bones, shells, hair, fibers, etc. This conference will address recent advances in our laboratory with the aim of contributing to some of the health challenges. To do this, we have to use platforms based on nanomaterials based on biopolymers. These include nanoparticles and nanocapsules capable of disrupting quorum sensing in Gram negative bacteria; nanocapsules capable of preventing the adhesion of Helicobacger pylori to stomach cells; electrostatically self-assembled nanocomplexes of chitosan and polynucleotides (pDNA, siRNA and microRNA) able to transfect cells of breast cancer and cystic fibrosis cells; and nanocapsules loaded with capsaicin that can reversibly disrupt the tight junctions and therefore permeabilize drugs across epithelial cell monolayers. In vitro proof-of-concept of the effectiveness of these systems will be discussed. The current obstacles and future perspectives will also be discussed in the context of the translation of these nanomedicine to the clinic.

Speaker
Biography:

Brigitte Deschrevel got her PhD in biophysicochemistry in 1993. Since, she is a senior lecturer in chemistry and biophysics at the Rouen University (France) where she carries out her research in the “Polymers, Biopolymers, Surfaces” laboratory (UMR 6270 CNRS). She is co-author of 24 papers and a patent, author of 2 book chapters and she presented her work in 25 international conferences. Her work has also led to collaborations with several companies. Since 2008, she is Director of the Chemistry Department of the Rouen University and, since 2015, she is member of the Academic Council of Normandy University.

Abstract:

We designed an innovative biomaterial combining structural, mechanical and biological properties for tridimensional cell development. It consists of a tridimensional scaffold, made of biosourced and biocompatible polymers such as poly(lactic acid), whose surface is functionalized with a nanolayer of biomolecules naturally occurring in the extracellular matrix. Our biomaterial is highly tunable and scalable and thus, it may be used for a diversity of applications in vitro as well as in vivo. We focus here on cartilage engineering and tumor engineering. Surface scaffold was functionalized with hyaluronan (HA), an abundant glycosaminoglycan in both cartilage and tumors. We showed that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) behaviors greatly depended on the composition of the polymeric scaffold and that their ability to differentiate into chondrocytes strongly varied according to the shape, the porosity, the pore diameter and the HA surface functionalization of the scaffold. Very interestingly, in porous asymmetric films which display an interconnected network of macro- and micropores and whose surface was functionalized with HA, MSC differentiate into mature chondrocytes with deposition of a hyaline cartilaginous matrix. Using porous asymmetric films, we also showed that interactions between MSC and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells strongly depended on the chain size of HA. While there was no physical interaction between the two cell types with high molecular weight HA (HMW-HA), MSC came to surround HT-29 spheroids in the presence of low molecular weight HA (LMW-HA). Moreover, with HMW-HA the microenvironment was found to be proinflammatory, while an increased secretion of proangiogenic cytokines were observed with LMW-HA.

Break:
Panel Discussion
Award & Closing ceremony